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So You Want to Buy a Massage Chair

Friday, February 21st, 2014

So You Want to Buy a Massage Chair

By Angie Patrick

Did you know a great way to market yourself as a massage therapist and become known in your community to those interested in massage is to work charity events or volunteer performing chair massage? Did you know this is an incredibly effective way to give people an opportunity to appreciate your talent as a therapist as well as afford you a pocket of time to develop a rapport in order to better your opportunity of retaining them as a client for further services? Did you know that there are professional massage chairs on the market ranging from under $200 to over $600? How do you know what you need? How can you be sure the chair you buy will best suit your needs? Let’s take a look at the different uses for a massage chair, and use that information to determine how much chair you need to fulfill your specific needs.

There are many reasons a therapist will buy a massage chair. Some make the purchase for occasional charity events and promotional opportunities. Others purchase a chair to utilize as an adjunct to their regular table. Some opt to buy to add additional services to their spa or salon waiting room, and then there are those who utilize their chair for their full time practice and use it several times a day 5 to 6 days a week. Each of these needs differ in that they require different performance from the chair that has been chosen.

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In this article, I would like to explore some of the options available on massage chairs and provide information that will enable you to make the appropriate choice for your own individualized purposes. I think a great place to begin is at the beginning: You have made a decision to purchase a chair. Now begins the research: which chairs offer the greatest adjustability; which offer a sternum pad; how do I adjust the seat; which is the lightest; which comes with a case with wheels; do I need wheels? How can I find a package deal, what IS a package deal?

OK, OK… Stop stressing already! Let’s take it one step at a time… First establish your need.

Let’s just say your intended use is for marketing yourself, your talents and your practice. Your goal is to obtain new clients for your regular practice. With this chair, you plan to attend charity events, fun runs, craft shows, etc. The primary use will not be for everyday use, and it is not your single source of income. Your potential clients will likely spend no more than 10-20 minutes total in the chair. All this being said, it stands to reason you may not wish to spend next month’s rent or mortgage payment on this chair. Luckily, there are some very economical options on the market that can fit this niche nicely, while still not requiring a credit line increase on the old charge card.

Economic Chair

You will likely find a chair that fits your needs in the $150-$250 price point. Usually, chairs in this area are not filled with a ton of bells and whistles, nor do they offer a wide array of customization and adjustment; however, for the purposes listed above, these chairs fit the bill! Light (usually made of light-weight aluminum), economical, and generally workable in functionality – these chairs will make it easy for you to start networking. Look for chairs in this price range to offer adjustable heights on the seat, adjustable slide sternum plates, and a dual adjustable headrest. These should also come with a carry case.

Mid- to High-End Chair

Now, let’s look at the chair you need for more regular and rigorous work, as a primary source of income. Some therapists make a very nice living offering mobile chair massage. Many gain entire office buildings as their “turf” and can spend an entire day simply working in a single location. Clients do not often have the time they would like to visit a therapist, and they are oh-so-happy to have one come by the office for a half hour to an hour. Some forward thinking companies even hire the therapist for a block of time or per client in order to provide this wonderful benefit for their employees. If you take this theory and apply it to five days a week, you can easily see how the income can grow. Even if you do not cater to office buildings, there are other venues that have proven successful as well. If you live near a conference center, perhaps you could contract to provide chair massage for the trade shows that come into town. Additionally, many hospitals will allow therapists in at the request of a doctor, OT or PT. Perhaps you just open a kiosk at the mall, and work on passers by. You are only limited by your own ingenuity, and no matter how you slice it, you need a chair that can stand up to the daily repeated use you will be giving it.

These chairs, built with long-term, repeated usage in mind range in price from $250 and up. The mean average for a stoutly made chair is around $350 and can go as high as over $600. These chairs have far greater flexibility in the adjustments, providing greater comfort for the client and also allowing you greater access. Typically these chairs are made of rolled steel, carbonized fiber, and aircraft grade aluminum. The padding is better in that it is softer and more pliable, while providing elasticity and bounce back. The weight allowances are a bit greater in this price range, and can allow you greater flexibility in clientele. These chairs may also weigh a bit more than the more economy chair largely due to their being built to withstand far greater and repeated usage. In most cases, the mid- and high-end chairs have a virtually endless color choice, while economy chairs are typically limited to only five or six.

Forming Your Decision

Some details to consider before making your decision:

First, consider the foam systems and the density they offer. Economy chairs often have a foam system consisting of two ply. One at the base is very dense while a softer and plusher layer is affixed atop. While this provides comfort for its intended use, it can begin to break down if it is in a constant daily use scenario. Conversely, the higher end chairs have taken into consideration the need for the padding to withstand constant use, and are typically three-ply deep. Using this same principal of layering, the layer closest to the base if the most dense, while the middle layer is a bit more flexible. The top layer is often quite plush and provides a luxurious feel to the client.

Second, consider the frame. How much weight will it withstand? Can you easily go from working on children to working on larger clients? Consider who your target market may be, and make your choices with this in mind.

Third, think about adjustability. If you are using this chair for everyday use, you will likely opt for a chair with considerable adjustment capability. Some chairs are adjustable down to the knee pads, and I find chairs offering greater options are a stronger choice for the full-time seated massage therapist. You have a greater capability of customizing the massage experience directly to your client’s weight, height and build. If your use is for occasional usage only, then the economy chair would still be a good fit.

Fourth, contemplate ease of use. Some higher end chairs are like trying to fold origami. Too many levers and complicated sequences can make a chair cumbersome, (albeit comfortable for the client.) The hope is you find something perfect for both of you! The economy chairs are not quite so complicated, and can offer great ease when you are on the road. Less adjustment means less knobs and levers. Determine your level of patience, and explore manufacturer’s Web sites to get a better picture of the adjustments chairs can offer.

Fifth, does my chair come with a package? Most do. Most chairs on the market are paired with a carry case for the protection of the chair and for ease in mobility.

One thing I would like to share, (and I cannot stress this enough) always be sure to buy from a reputable dealer of professional grade massage products. Do not skimp on this. In the short term, it seems you will be able to save a few bucks and buy a chair secondhand. However, let there be an issue with breakage, or malfunction and you are wholly stuck with a broken and dilapidated used chair. This can set you back to square one, and you are out your initial investment in substandard equipment. When you choose a reputable dealer, you have the advantage of the resellers warranty as well as the manufacturer’s warranty. Both are invaluable to you if your chair ever has an issue.

Chair massage can be a tremendous value to those looking for an add-on therapy, a means to market, or a way to earn a little extra money on the weekends. It can also be a lucrative full-time career. Just be sure to do your homework, visit the Web, check out and compare features, and then make your informed decision. Everyone has a different need, and I hope some of these tips can help you better define your own and give you a head start in finding the perfect chair for your individual needs.  View more of Angie Patrick’s articles at Massage Today.

 

At MassageWarehouse.com, massage therapist enjoy a one-stop shop for professional quality massage products at the lowest prices available.  Rely on Massage Warehouse massage therapy supply and equipment needs.  MassageWarehouse carries many brands including Earthlite, Bon Vital, Oakworks, Soothing touch, Biofreeze, Stronglite, Biotone and many more

 

Get Started with this Biofreeze Stress-Melter Pain-Relieving Massage!

Saturday, February 1st, 2014

BIOFREEZE® Stress Melter Pain Relieving Massage

incorporate-biofreeze

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This full body therapeutic massage uses BIOFREEZE Gel, a pain relieving topical cooling gel during the massage treatment. This massage focuses on specific areas of tight and painful muscles and joints using various massage strokes to relieve tension and pain. More concentrated work on muscle spasm and chronic tension where most of us hold our stress will be given at the end of this treatment. A tube of BIOFREEZE Gel is included for home care use to continue the pain relieving experience at home. This massage will leave the client stimulated, invigorated and will help melt their stress away.

 

Treatment Time: 60 minutes

 

Benefits of Treatment:

1. Relieve stress

2. Reduce muscle spasm

3. Reduce discomfort and pain

4. Increase circulation

5. Improve range of motion

6. Over all invigorating feeling

 

Contraindications:

1. Sunburn

2. Skin rashes or conditions

3. Open sores

4. Severe high blood pressure

5. Fever or infections

 

Products, Supplies and Equipment:

1. Massage Table

2. Two Sheets and Drape

3. Face Cradle Cover

4. Bolster

5. Massage Oil

6. BIOFREEZE Gel

7. PROSSAGE Heat

 

Prepare Treatment Room and Table:

1. Massage Table:

a. Drape two sheets, one on top of the other, folding top sheet down partially with a diagonal fold.

2. Treatment Room:

a. Have several hand towels ready (if needed) for additional draping.

b. Have bolsters and pillows available (if needed) for additional client comfort prepared with clean linens.

c. Have massage oil, BIOFREEZE topical analgesic, PROSSAGE Heat, etc., as needed per specified massage protocols, prepared on counter.

d. Create a comforting and de-stressing environment with soft music, lowered lighting and any specified amenities such as fresh flowers, or product samples on table.

 

Client Communication:

• Pick up client

• Have client complete in-take form

• Conduct pre-massage interview

• Explain sequence and benefits of products

• Provide and explain draping

• Step out as client gets on table

• Knock and step in

• Bolster client for comfort

• Begin work using the following protocol

 

Treatment Protocol:

1. Client is positioned supine (face up).

2. Start by placing hands on the client’s upper trapezius and effleurage the neck.

3. Massage face starting at the chin and working toward the forehead and then move to the head performing friction massage movements.

4. Move to the client’s neck and apply oil to the neck. Apply bilateral effleurage beginning at the sternal notch and use the hands simultaneously. Continue from the sternum over the shoulder and along the traps to the occipital ridge. Repeat at least three times.

5. Turnclients head to one side and apply effleurage to the side of the neck starting at the mastoid, con

tinue the movement across the shoulder and around the deltoid muscle and back to the base of the neck.  Repeat at least three times.

6. Apply petrissage, friction and vibration strokes to the neck and shoulders.

7. Apply passive joint movement by rolling the head forward, passive stretch by supporting the head side-

to-side and pushing the opposite shoulder. Apply passive rotation to the neck.

8. Next, apply slight traction to the cervical spine by hooking the fingers under the occiput and pulling.

9. Finish by applying alternating pressure toward the foot of the table and rock gently and stretch shoulders.

10.You may apply BIOFREEZE Gel to any tender anterior points as needed at this point of the massage.

11. Massage each arm and hand with effleurage, petrissage and stripping strokes for 3 to 5 minutes for each arm.

12. Massage each leg using effleurage, petrissage, broadening friction and stripping strokes 3 to 5 minutes

per leg.

13. Massage each foot for 2 to 3 minutes. Begin at the sole, kneading the foot and then applying friction, covering the front of the foot and stretching each foot.

14. Re-drape client and apply feather strokes over the drape before turning the client.

 

(25 minutes total massage time for the supine massage)

 

1. Client is then moved to prone (face down) position.

2. The soles of the feet are massaged and pressure points used; legs and calves, gluteals are massaged using petrissage, effleurage, broadening, friction and stripping strokes; ten minutes for this part of the massage.

3. Start with a light touch at the base of the neck and the other hand at the base of the spine.

4. Apply massage oil to the clients back using effleurage strokes starting at the head and go to the sacrum.

5. Then apply a thin layer of BIOFREEZE Gel to the back; massage BIOFREEZE Gel into the back and continue massaging the back using effleurage, petrissage, and compression strokes with the BIOFREEZE oil mixture.

6. Petrissage the trapezius and then the entire side of the back that is opposite the therapist, repeating this at least three times. Then move to the other side of table and repeat.

7. Use deep gliding stripping movements using braced thumbs on the back, can also use the elbow and forearm to do deep gliding when working on the back.

8. Move to the shoulders and perform direct pressure and friction to the trapezius and rhomboid area.

9. Perform trigger point work on the rotator cuff area as needed at this time.

10. Then work the cervical muscles face down using effleurage, petrissage strokes.

11. Then focus on the sub-occipital ridge doing circular friction back and forward on the ridge and above and below it.

12. Move to the head and massage starting at the base of the neck and apply friction to the sc

alp.

13. Follow up with additional massage to areas of tension and pain at this time.

14. Can apply tapotement, percussion or vibration at this time.

15. Apply stretches to the back and end with feather strokes.

 

(20-minute massage on back)

 

1. Re-drape client and apply compression over the drape from the feet to the clients shoulders.

2. Explain that the BIOFREEZE cooling effect will stay with client for a few hours and step out of room.

3. Give tube of BIOFREEZE Gel with home care after treatment.

 

Closure: Thank your client and step out.

 

Special notes:

A higher price should be charged when a tube of BIOFREEZE product is included with this treatment along with home use instructions. The BIOFREEZE Massage Pain Relieving Massage Melter is intended to be a revitalizing treatment. For a less intense treatment, BIOFREEZE Gel with massage oil during the massage can be omitted and applied just during the trigger point work and around joints at the end of this treatment. This massage may be varied due to client needs.  BIOFREEZE topical analgesic should only be used with massage oil, not creams or lotions to create a BIOFREEZE mixture for the BIOFREEZE massage. This treatment is also a great time to use the BIOFREEZE spray on the client’s feet at the end of the treatment.

 

Technique Definitions:

• Broadening Strokes: The application of palm strokes from the centerline of an extremity laterally outward.

• Compression: A rhythmic pumping action movement on muscle straight in and out intended to spread muscle fiber.

• Compressive Effleurage: The application of gliding strokes with enough pressure to create a displacement of tissue for the purpose of moving fluid.

• Cross Fiber Friction: The application of compressive movements on muscles with the angle 90 degrees to the fibers of the muscle.

• Direct Pressure: The application of compression of tissue with static pressure.

• Effleurage: The application of gliding strokes that follow the contour of the body.

• Flats of Hands: Applying gliding strokes with the backs of your fingers while using loose fists.

• Friction: The application of compression of tissue while adding movement.

• Petrissage: The application of lifting, squeezing and kneading strokes to tissues of the body.

• Stripping Strokes: The application of specific gliding strokes over a muscle usually from distal to proximal.

• Tapotement or Percussion: The application of alternating, rhythmical striking movements to the body.

 

 

Disclaimer:

These treatments are intended to be used by Health Care and Massage Professionals only. They are intended to be used as a guide and should not replace the advice of a medical doctor or health care provider. Please check with the client’s healthcare provider when in doubt before using any of these treatments and/or BIOFREEZE & PROSSAGE Heat products.

Treatment written and designed by Lynda Solien-Wolfe LMT, NCTMB -Solwolfe Resource Group, Inc. and Michael McGillicuddy LMT, NCTMB -USA Pro-Sports.

Choosing and Caring for Linens

Friday, November 15th, 2013

Ten for Today
By Rebecca Jones

Choosing and Caring for Linens
Michigan massage therapist Patrice Wisner thought she’d figured out her linen laundry dilemma when her husband started washing smaller loads and using more detergent. The result was cleaner sheets, fewer impossible-to-get-out oil stains, and no more lingering smell of oil. Then, some of her clients started sneezing when they got on her table. “Too much detergent?” she wonders. “Currently, we use detergent and bleach, but we’re on a septic system and I can’t say that it’s all that great for my septic system to use so much bleach to get these sheets clean. But if I don’t, they start to smell when they come out of the dryer, and at some point later on they start to smell like French fries! There’s just got to be an answer.” Table linens are one of the most important accessories massage therapists will purchase, since those linens are so visible to clients. And caring properly for the linens is one of the most important steps in maintaining a hygienic practice. The experts all agree: don’t short sheet your massage practice by choosing anything less than the best-quality linens you can afford and keep them in tip-top shape. Here are some pointers for selecting the right linens for your practice, and how to care for them so they always send a positive message to clients.

1. Pure or Blended
Some people avoid 100 percent cotton massage sheets, preferring the wrinkle-resistance and greater durability that comes from cotton/polyester blends. But there’s much to be said for the comfort and soft feel of 100 percent cotton. They also tend to release oil more readily than blends. Likewise, those who appreciate earth-friendly sheets may even look into hemp sheets—more expensive initially, but extremely long lasting—or certified-organic cotton sheets. Remember that you get what you pay for in most instances and quality sheets will not pill as easily as cheaper ones. There’s no one best answer. It’s just a matter of personal preference.

2. Flannel’s Appeal
“It’s the most comfortable sheet there is,” says Steve Gern, owner of Sew & Sew, a maker of massage sheets in Glide, Oregon. And while the quality of other kinds of sheets is measured in thread count—the higher the better, as a rule—that’s not true with flannel sheets. Flannel is measured in weight. Sew & Sew, for instance, carries 3.8-ounce and 5-ounce flannel sheets, with the heavier-weight flannel costing a bit more. The heavier the weight, the more plush the feel and the more washings it can endure. And while flannel is mostly associated with chilly climates, it’s actually a good product for warm weather, too, since it wicks away perspiration more readily than other materials.

3. Your Linen Closet
John Sise, owner of Innerpeace, a Walpole, New Hampshire, massage linen company, suggests keeping a minimum of two days worth of linens. So, if you’re going to do five massages a day, you need to have at least 10 sets of standard-width (46-inch) sheets on hand. “We recognize that some people may need a wider top sheet, so we recommend that the therapist has a few wide top flat sheets to accommodate the people who may have extra modesty issues or are larger than the average client,” Sise says. It’s also a good idea to keep plenty of hand towels nearby. “They’re really good for wiping a client off, so you don’t have to use a sheet or a drape to wipe them off,” says Diana Dapkins, president of Pure Pro Massage Products, of Greenfield, Massachusetts. “And if you spill a product, they’re just a nice tool to have around.”

4. Solids Versus Prints
Again, this is a matter of personal preference. There are lots of beautiful prints on the market, including batiks and themed designs, but Gern says he sold so few printed sheets he stopped carrying them. Solids—especially whites—look clean and hygienic, but prints carry one big advantage over solids: they can help camouflage stains.

5. Sanitation Rules
Of course, don’t reuse any towel or sheet that has come in contact with a client before laundering it. Sheets should be changed after every client. Same for face-rest covers. Find a hamper for dirty linens that is well away from the clean ones. Make sure to sterilize all table surfaces between clients. Select quality, ecofriendly cleaning products that are considerate of clients’ allergies and void of artificial scents. And, of course, thoroughly wash your hands between clients.

6. Laundry Tips
Experts disagree about the ideal temperature at which to launder your linens. Norma Keyes, director of product standards for Cotton Inc., a trade group to promote cotton products, advises using the hottest water possible to remove stains and odor. Gern and Sise say hot water only sets in stains. They recommend warm water. Dapkins insists warm to lukewarm is fine, and that even washing in cold water is acceptable. But here’s something they all agree on: get them washed as soon as possible—within 24 hours of use. “If you must wait to wash them, store them in black plastic bags,” Dapkins says. “Tie the bags shut to keep out air and light, as these are the two things that turn oil rancid.” For badly stained linens, allow them to soak in a degreaser, then launder them twice to completely remove oily residue. For stubborn stains, add bleach to the second wash so the bleach can penetrate after some of the oily buildup is gone, Dapkins suggests.

7. Special Supplies
Unlike bed linens, which are only for sleeping, massage table linens get regularly doused with oil. Simply tossing them into the wash with other linens won’t be adequate. Some sort of degreaser must be used, experts say. One possibility is dish soap, which won’t harm linens, or the spray product called Zout. Dapkins created Pure Pro Linen Degreaser, a citrus-based product, specifically with the demands of massage therapists in mind. “I got tired of hearing massage therapists talk about stained linens,” she says. “It’s a citrus-based solvent, which is very different from other products on the market that are petroleum-based. Anyone will tell you that vegetable oil is tough. It doesn’t mix with water and it doesn’t come out very easily. The citrus solvents are just phenomenal at eating vegetable oil.” She says degreasers do not remove stains. That’s what bleach is for. But before the bleach can work, massage linens may require an initial washing with a degreaser.

8. Dryer Safety
If a sheet comes out of the washer still smelling of oil, do not put it in the dryer. Drying it will only worsen the problem, because it will bake in the oil residue, making removal even harder. What’s more, there’s a safety issue involved. “We’ve had a number of people with dryer fires, because they put the stuff in the dryer and it combusted. There was simply too much residue on the linens,” Dapkins says.

9. Folding Technique
Yes, there really is a secret to folding a fitted sheet, and if you master it, your linen cabinets will be forever neater. Start by pulling the sheet out of the dryer immediately, not letting it sit around unfolded for hours. You’ll need to spread the sheet out on a table or bed. Fold it in half horizontally, then tuck the top gathered end into the pocket formed by the bottom gathered end. Fold everything horizontally in half again. Then fold the bulky gathered ends horizontally into the middle of the ten for todaysheet. Fold the smooth end over the top of the bulky end, then fold lengthwise into thirds yet again. If you’re having trouble picturing this, a number of online reference sites have step-by-step picture guides. Just type “fold a fitted sheet” into your Web browser, and you’ll find lots of online help.

10. Letting Go
Finally, if you see any sign of holes, broken elastic, fraying, or anything that looks unserviceable, it’s time to find a different use for that sheet than putting it under a massage client. And if you’ve tried every trick you know and you still can’t get a stain out, surrender to the inevitable and ditch the sheet. “If you get a year’s worth of service out of a sheet, and you do 25 clients a week, remember that’s just pennies per use. You’ve gotten your money out of that sheet,” Dapkins says.

Rebecca Jones is a Denver-based freelancer who has a new appreciation for the intricacies of massage linens. Contact her at killarneyrose@comcast.net.

 

Associated Bodywork & Massage Professionals original article:
http://www.abmp.com/massagemarketplace/downloads/TenForToday_JF09.pdf
Additional resources:
http://www.massageandbodyworkdigital.com/i/196551

Raw Material Costs on the Rise for the Massage and Spa Industry

Tuesday, April 26th, 2011

Raw Material Costs on the Rise

April 21, 2011

By Angie Patrick

Some might say, “So What, Angie? I am not a manufacturer, this will not impact me!”

Ahhh,… not so! It impacts everyone, even in places you weren’t expecting! Let me share with you a quick snapshot of some of the manufacturing landscape and how it might impact your bottom line.

Raw materials are the components purchased from all over the globe that enable manufacturers to create and produce the items we use everyday. It is a delicate balance that industry strikes when it comes to manufacturing goods while remaining competitively priced for the finished goods. In the last quarter, there have been some tell tale signs that some of the items commonly used in the Massage industry may become a bit more pricey, or worse yet, unavailable entirely. This can impact you and your practice in a few ways. Below are a couple of things you may begin to see in the marketplace.

The Argentinean Jojoba crops, which are a significant percentage of the world jojoba crops, were damaged by frost this year. Ordinarily, one might expect the plants to bounce back and thrive, albeit a bit later than usual. Unfortunately for us, the frost hit at a crucial time in the growth cycle of the plant, damaging it at the seed pod level. Once they sustained freeze damage, many of the soon-to-be-plants died. This loss was unrecoverable, and thus the price for Raw Jojoba Oil has skyrocketed. This has been reported to be a temporary situation, but it can likely impact product production nationwide.

Many massage lubricants depend on Jojoba, as it is a magnificent product for the skin, and a go-to ingredient for formulators. You may begin to see some goods temporarily discontinued, and for those remaining on the market, you could in fact see a slight price increase. This is the nature of business when you manufacture goods and depend on crops for your raw ingredients. My advice, buy jojoba now, especially if you love to use pure jojoba oil. Given the shelf life is years and years as long as it is stored properly, it is a good buy that will keep well.

Mother Nature impacts us in many ways and it extends to the world cotton supply as well. The cost of cottonhas been on a steady increase over the last three years, varying from $.40 cents per pound to over $1.89 for completely raw goods. How does this impact the Massage and Spa industry? ALL OVER! From the spa slippers, to the robes, towels, hand cloths, and above all, Massage Sheets! These items are all pricier now than ever before to manufacture, and I have watched the market creep up slowly in terms of price to the end user.

One market that we may potentially see increase in the coming quarters may be foam production. With the unrest in the Middle East, and oil prices moving the full gamut to even exceed $5.00 per gallon some experts predict, we can almost assuredly expect the costs of foam to rise. This is in portable massage tables, massage bolsters, massage chairs, massage stools, and more. A great alternative may be soy foam in some applications, thus reducing the dependency on petroleum as a raw product.

Which brings us to oil… Oil is fluctuating at the time of this post by 2-3 dollars a gallon day by day. This means increased prices for gasoline which impacts a mobile therapist in obvious ways, as your costs for fuel to run your business is going up. But it also impacts your shipping costs for anything your purchase as well. From the grocery store, to the big-box retailers, everyone is sustaining rising shipping costs. No one is immune to this cost increase, with added fuel surcharges being assessed with each shipment of goods to distribution centers and retail outlets, it is a cost that will in many cases be felt by the end user. With this in mind, you can save some money by planning your purchases biweekly and in greater bulk. This can reduce the usage of fuel, and the need for repeated deliveries.

The world is a series of interconnected happenings that singly may not seem to Amount to a hill of beans, but when you dig into the far reaching implications as well as examine how these implications could impact you personally, you begin to see the world as it is…A living and breathing thing we all depend on in ways we may never have even considered before.

Find more articles by Angie Patrick at Massage Today.

10 Tips For Spring Cleaning Your Massage Practice

Monday, March 28th, 2011

Look Out, It’s Time to Clean House!
By Angie Patrick

Maybe I am channeling my inner Martha Stewart, or maybe I am just inspired since I saw some semi-icky stuff during a massage recently, but I believe we can all use a checklist to make sure our business, practice, massage room and equipment are up to par and ready for Spring. Here are a few things you can do to help get ready and be out with the old winter grunge and in with the fresh spring air!

1: I know it is hard to remember that people on a massage table can see under your counters or under your side tables…The fact is, this perspective on your practice is often overlooked by massage therapists and employees. You would not believe some of the yuk that can accrue under there like dust bunnies with fangs, cobwebs that look like they were made by a tarantula, and bits of paper and candy wrappers that have missed the broom a few times because they are “JUST” out of reach.

If your client returns week after week, and sees this kind of thing going unchecked, they “MAY” have the impression the entire facility isn’t clean. While it may not be true, does that really matter if the client does not return? Will it help if they tell five people they know your massage practice is dirty? Nope….! So take a moment, get on your massage table, face up, side lying, and face down. What do you see? If you see UNDER SOMETHING, be sure to keep it CLEAN!

2: Check Expiration Dates on all things that can expire. Be sure to check your retail shelves as well as your back bar for anything that may be going out soon. If you have something about to expire, run a special or sale on a treatment requiring that product. If your pale of sugar scrub has a bit left in it, but expires in 2 months, then run a special on sugar scrubs to be sure you get the most for your money!

3: Linen Inspection. “Oh Angie, lighten up… My sheets are FINE! “ Hmmm…..I would not be so hasty! When was the last time you put your massage sheets on a table and got between them? Are they pilling, do they smell or feel scratchy? Are they frayed in any way? Is there an oil stain you have simply stopped seeing, but fresh eyes could pick out in a lineup? Check these things out! Massage sheets are not meant to last forever. In fact, we are in one of the only professions that can really consider sheets a disposable. So take a moment to go through your linens, make sure they smell fresh and are unstained, and are in good working order. Replace sets that have passed their prime. < C’mon, do the math…… let’s say 20 bucks a set, divided by a client a day for two years? Yeah, it’s time to retire them or re purpose them! They have provided you great value!>

Read more at Massage Today.