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First Annual American Massage Job Fair

Wednesday, March 2nd, 2011

First Annual American Massage Job Fair

By Angie Patrick

Some people spend their whole lives asking in hushed tones, “Why?” I prefer to think of the larger picture and sing loudly in a strong, pronounced operatic voice, “Why NOT?” (with extra emphasis on the NOT for effect).

Just because you have never seen it done, does not mean it shouldn’t be. In fact, I look upon the unknown as just about enough probable cause to take the bull by the horns and take action. If someone does not go first, who will? And if you have the ability, location, contacts, resources, and desire – the only thing holding you back is fear. Fear is a four-letter word. And in this economy, sometimes you have to stop being fearful, and begin to be bold in your thinking and in your processes. What worked before may not be what will work now, and the fear that can surround an unemployed massage therapist is something that can nag and weigh you down when you should be using your energy and talents for healing and helping.

This is the entire drive behind the First Annual American Massage Job Fair being held at the American Massage Conference in Atlanta on May 22, 2011 from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. This is a ground-breaking event bringing massage therapy employers together to find talent often hidden from view when answering an ad online or in the paper.

The job fair will host many potential employers including schools, spas, chiropractors, franchises and more. It will indeed be the place to find a repository of potential employers ready and willing to talk to you on-the-spot. Our industry believes in the power of relationships, networking, and above all else – human interaction. Meeting potential employers and having a brief moment to make a connection in some way is hugely paramount to a successful application process.

To be as successful as can be at the Job Fair, let me give you a few tips that can help you along in the process.

Job Fair 101

First, understand this is a Job Fair, and it is a cursory meeting to give both parties an opportunity to scope one another out and to make a connection. A full-blown interview will likely not occur this day, but a subsequent call may indeed come and you may be asked back for further interviewing.

Bring many copies of your resume, but only bring a condensed version that pertains to the profession at hand. It should outline your education, your hands-on experience, modalities you know, and any work experience and achievements. If you have been employed in another field as a career before the current, then by all means list it. But, please do not list your part-time, summer, or temp jobs unless they pertain to this industry. Time is limited; let your best assets shine, and avoid having the only thing remembered about you is that you once did a summer landscaping job five years ago.

Be sure to have your 3-minute speech ready to go: “Hi, I am Angie, and I am looking for a job that ____. I feel I can provide ____ to any position, and my availability is ____.”
Be intentional with your words; leave out any: umm’s, errr’s, I-mean’s, or uh’s. These words do not leave a good impression, and are certainly not what potential employers wish to hear at a job fair where time is limited, or any other setting for that matter.

Find your confidence, know what you bring to the table, hold your head high, wear your lucky underwear and get noticed.

Be certain you have gathered business cards from each and every employer, regardless of whether you were able to connect personally or not. If time is waning, leave your resume on the table and pick up a card. You will use this card as part of your contact list and utilize the data on it to follow-up on your resume.

If you are indeed able to get face time with the employer, you will most assuredly want to follow-up after the job fair to thank them for their time and consideration. A handwritten note goes a long way here as it is unexpected and certainly out of the norm. In other words, you will get noticed.

To pre-register for the free Job Fair, visit AmericanMassageConference.com/JobFair to be sure you can get in without waiting in an on-site registration line. In this case, the early bird won’t just get the best worm, they may get the best JOB.

Read more on Massage Today Link

Thumbby Soft Massage Cone

Wednesday, February 23rd, 2011

Thumbby™ Soft Massage Cone FAQ

Q. What is the Thumbby™ massager made of?

A. The Thumbby™ massager is made of solid silicone, the same material used for many household and personal items. Silicone is non-reactive, meaning it can be used with most massage lotions and oils.

Q. How hard is the Thumbby™ massager?

A. The Thumbby™ massager is approximately the same hardness as a human thumb. In use it is often indistinguishable from a thumb by the person receiving the massage.

Q. How big is the Thumbby™ massager?

A. The Thumbby™ massager is about 3 inches across by 2 inches high, and weighs about 5.5 ounces – small enough to fit in a purse, briefcase, backpack, or carryon.

Q. Is it better to use the Thumbby™ massager dry or with oil?

A. The Thumbby™ massager can be used with or without oil. Each is better for certain types of massage.

  • When the Thumbby™ massager is used dry, it grips the skin. This is good for deep pressure/trigger point work, cross-fiber massage, and vibration (shaking the muscle).


  • When the Thumbby™ massager is used with oil, it glides over the skin. This is good for effleurage (broad strokes using the slope or shoulder of the massager), petrissage (circling movements using the point of the massager), and muscle stripping (slow heavy pressure along the length of a muscle). When using oil with a Thumbby™ massager, use your other hand to guide it.


Q. I’m a small person with weak arms and hands; my partner is very strong and needs deep pressure. How do I use theThumbby™ massager to give deep massage?

A. Thumbby™ massager is designed to let you use body weight instead of strength to achieve deep pressure. Use this method to support your wrist while using body weight:

  1. Hold the massager in your non-dominant hand with the point on the knot you want to loosen.
  2. Make a loose fist with your dominant hand and place your knuckles on the back of the massager, as shown.


  1. Hold the thumb of the non-dominant hand for stability.
  2. Keep your arm and wrist straight and lean into it. Your upper body weight will be transferred to the point of the ThumbbyTM massager.

Q. I have back and shoulder pain, and no one to massage me. Can the Thumbby™ massage tool help me?

A. Yes. The Thumbby™ massager sticks to smooth surfaces, so you can stick it onto your refrigerator (for example) and be able to press the sore places into it. You can also place the massager inside the back of a chair and lean on it. And if you want deeper pressure, you can lie on a Thumbby™ massager on a bed, a futon, or the floor.

Do Massage Therapists Believe in Magic?

Friday, February 11th, 2011

Do You Believe in Magic?

I wish for abundance for all, don’t you?
I wish for professional education for all, don’t you?
I wish for ways to better myself and my business, don’t you?
I wish there were some magic wand that could make all this happen, don’t you?

I am not sure about you, but I answered YES to all of the above. But how can you make all these things a reality. How can you begin the wheels of progress turning so that each of these wishes might come true. I personally believe you should first see the greater scale of the goal, and then begin your journey in a space that makes sense to you and is also within your scope of immediate control.
As much as I would like to change the world for the better, I have to do my part one step at a time. If I look at the entire need in its bulk sum, it can be overwhelming. But if I can break this down into things which I can control, then MASTER THEM, I find I am in a far greater and much stronger place to impact my world for the better.
It is often difficult to see the needs and feel empowered to help unless your own house is in order. If you are struggling to make it, then seeing a way to reach out and help other s seems more daunting. So how can we begin to impact CHANGE within our own house? I believe we first must recognize the opportunity we have before us to strengthen our own foundations. If you better educate yourself, your business may prosper providing greater abundance for you and your family. And waving the magic wand is not as difficult as you may think.
Since you are reading this on a computer, then no doubt you are somewhat computer savvy. I have personally been amazed at the plethora of educational resources, free seminars, free webinars, downloadable ebooks, and online conferences spanning across CAM segments these days. Much of this education, instruction, direction and perspective can be found in free massage resources online.

Read more on Massage Today Link

Best Careers 2011: Massage Therapist

Wednesday, December 8th, 2010

Massage therapists may be good with their hands, but most also have a knack for business. You’re likely to work for yourself, and your success depends largely on how many clients you bring in, so you’ll need to market yourself well and develop a rapport with repeat customers. Many massage therapists work part time in several locations, including spas, hospitals, cruise ships, and sports centers.

Click here to find out more!

Massage therapy uses touch to treat injuries, sooth tired or overworked muscles, reduce stress, and promote general health. Treatment comes in many varieties, including Swedish massage, deep-tissue massage, reflexology, and sports massage, and most therapists specialize in one or more. In most states, massage therapists need a license to practice.

The outlook:

As massage therapy becomes more popular, employment is expected to grow faster than average—19 percent between 2008 and 2018, according to the Labor Department. Although this industry certainly hasn’t been spared the wrath of the recession, more spas and massage clinic franchises are popping up to meet increased demand for massage services, creating new openings for therapists. Massage therapists held about 122,400 jobs in 2008, and more than half were self-employed. Many more practice massage therapy as a secondary source of income.

Of those who are self-employed, most own their own businesses or work as independent contractors. Others find employment in personal care services establishments, the offices of physicians and chiropractors, fitness and recreational sports centers, and hotels. Employment is concentrated in metropolitan areas, as well as resort and destination locales.

Read more Link

Earthlite Zenvi Sound Cushion

Friday, November 5th, 2010

The Earthlite Zenvi Sound Cushion is most definitely a helping hand to all massage therapists.  The Zenvi Sound Cushion by Earthlite is a new innovative face rest cover that will enhance your client’s treatment by letting your client choose his or her music with an ipod or any mp3 player. We also know that sometimes there is some excess noise within our treatment facilities and the Zenvi Sound Cushion virtually eliminates all off this excess noise as the music is right with them blocking out anything else.

Massage Warehouse has always been a leader in the massage supply industry and we will always continue to bring you quality products like the Zenvi Sound Cushion. See for yourself what all the buzz is about and give your clients an unforgettable experience with your new headrest cover by Earthlite.

Full Body Massage Therapy Tips & Techniques

Saturday, August 14th, 2010

Massage has been used as a curing therapy for many thousands of years. Records dating back to 2700 B.C. show that in China massage was used to treat many illnesses or to prevent any. Even Hippocrates, the famous Greek physician writing in 400 B.C., recommended that physicians should treat war or sports injuries with rubbing and massage.

The ancient cultures of Japan, Rome, Egypt and Arabia all considered massage to be calming, soothing and relaxing, and also very important as a therapeutic therapy. Now, in the 21st century, there are many different kinds of massage therapies available, each of which offers specific benefits to the mind and body. Full Body Massage is one of them.

These forms of specific massage can be used to treat a wide range of conditions, plus they can be used to simply unwind and relax.


Tennis Ball Massage for Myofascial Pain Syndrome

Saturday, July 31st, 2010

As you may know,  we are big fans of the Trigger Point Therapy Workbook by Clair Davies. Joe Weir and I were talking about one “humble” but very popular tool for trigger-point self-therapy and for self-massage in general, as is discussed here:

Tennis Ball Massage for Myofascial Pain Syndrome

You can find a great deal of information on trigger points on that site, btw. Both Joe and I know how useful it is but we were also discussing it’s limitations.

The thing is most people use a tennis ball on the floor. They roll around on it to target the thighs and glute medius..things like that. While I have done this quite a few times myself there are a few problems/limitations:

1. If you weigh a lot the tennis ball will collapse.

So, you can use a lacrosse ball or you can purchase a self-massage ball of some kind, which are available in different degrees of firmness. This could be useful because if you are new too to self-massage something like a lacrosse ball may be too hard for you.

The website I just linked mentions a “Kong” pet toy as a massage tool. Which may work also but I would think this would be awkward since they are not perfectly round. But whatever the case: