| Call 1.800.910.9955
Shop By:
  • Pages

  • Archives

  • Categories

  • Meta

  • Seeing the Mess Right in Front of You: A Spring Cleaning Checklist

    March 23rd, 2016

    Seeing the Mess Right in Front of You: A Spring Cleaning Checklist

    By Angie Patrick

    We have all done it. When left to our own devices in waiting rooms, exam rooms, massage rooms, gyms and other healthcare-related locations, we all either consciously or subconsciously do a mental sweep for cleanliness. We all want to believe the place in which we visit and choose to place our trust keeps an orderly household and is free from cross contaminating issues. And whether we are aware of it or not, a mis-step here by staff or the proprietor can color your thinking of the practice or facility. We hold these providers to a higher standard of cleanliness than we often do within our own homes. Finding something that goes against your expectations for cleanliness can indeed sour your confidence in the provider a bit. Depending on the offending infraction, it may even result in you leaving the provider in search of cleaner grounds.

    The Waiting Room

    Let’s start with the waiting room. You may be thinking, “How much could possibly go wrong there?” Well, it is more than you think! The waiting room is the very first impression the client gets of what may lay ahead. Consider your clients sitting idly by, waiting for you to be clear of a previous client. What are they doing while they wait? Some are looking at their phones, checking email or web surfing. Some may be looking at magazines you have placed in your waiting area. Others may have nothing else to occupy them besides looking at your room and inspecting the elements within it.

    Have you looked at the corners both high and low? Are there dust bunnies or cobwebs? Sometimes, behind the door can be easily missed by staff and cleaning crews and may well need attention. If you have artwork hanging, have you looked at the glass and frame for accumulated dust? Are your tables, shelves and counter tops free of clutter and dust? Are the plants healthy and watered? Do your retail offerings look tired and old? Does your retail display have gaps or need replenishing? If you have magazines, are they current or are they 6 to 12 months old? Missing these key areas can give your client the mental image of your practice being one that pays little attention to detail. If that is not the impression you would like to leave in the mind of your client, take some time to look at your waiting area with fresh eyes and work to declutter and cleanse the space.

    The Treatment Room

    Next, let’s discuss the treatment room. In this space, your client may disrobe, place personal items someplace within the room, and avail themselves to the comforts of your table. Beginning from the moment they enter the space, what are the first impressions? Does it smell clean or of essential oils, or does it smell like the breakroom with lunchtime leftovers from the previous night’s dinner? If you work in your home, does your cat box or other pet odor greet your clients upon entering? Does your space please the olfactory senses, or are there any faint unpleasant odors? If you cannot tell, ask a friend to check this for you periodically, as you may no longer be able to detect any unpleasant scents.

    Visually, inspect your treatment room for many of the same issue we inspected the waiting room. However, in this case, you are going to go a step or two further. Consider what the client sees in your room from several perspectives, first being standing upright and walking into the room. What do they see at eye level and on the floor? When they look up, are your light bulbs all operable? Is there adequate lighting for them to complete tasks involved in preparing for treatment? Is there a place for them to place their personal effects with care, and not have them simply tossed on a chair? Is the place for their personal items something that can be wiped clean between clients?

    The second place of inspection should be from a table perspective. The client will be spending a great deal of time here, and unless you get on your table and take a look, you may be missing some cleaning issues. Are the shelves, cubbies, counters and table tops seen from this angle free of dust, prints and debris? Are your chair legs free of dust and webs? As you will be able to see the underside of tables and carts, are there cob webs there that need to be removed? Look at the carpeting or flooring directly under the face cradle. Is it clean and debris free, or can the ghosts of salt or sugar granules from previous body scrubs be seen? Look at the waste baskets and specifically under toe kick plates of cabinetry for any gum wrappers, cough drop wrappers, or other trash lurking there.

    Since we are discussing impressions from the table perspective, let’s objectively examine the table additives you use daily. Starting with your table warmer, look at it closely and inspect the wiring to be sure you have no signs of stress. Further, touch it yourself and insure you have no hot or cool spots. Consider your table warmer as a consumable product, because it truly is. Given its use day in, day out, for hours a day, you can rest assured these will eventually need replacing.

    The same will hold true of your linens. With fresh eyes, take a long look at the linens your clients encounter. These linens are likely washed daily, or at a minimum several times weekly. This is as much as three to five times more often than your household bed linens, and with this much use and laundering, these too will begin to show signs of wear. Beyond visual inspection, touch and smell them and determine if they are fresh, soft and comfy, or if they have begun to pill and shed. Sheets are also a consumable product, and should be replaced once they become worn and no longer convey the image you wish to project of your practice. While these linens may no longer have a place in your practice, consider donating them to homeless shelters. If you have no homeless shelter in your area, consider these as a gift to your local animal shelter. They still have life remaining in them, so put them to great use.

    Lastly, take in a visual evaluation of your treatment space from chair level. If the client uses a chair to re-dress following a treatment session, look at what they see from this seated perspective. If you have supplies on counters or carts, are they organized and housed in a sanitary way? If you have plants, again check to be sure they are not dry or dying. If you have chair rails, have they been wiped free of dust? If you have a mirror in the room for the client to use when re-dressing, is it free of smudges and prints? Has your waste basket been emptied prior to each client? If a client sees the same trash twice in separate visits, you may never see the client again and have no reason why they left. Unless you inspect from each and every angle you may not catch it all.

    These suggestions are to coincide with your regular disinfecting and cross contamination prevention. Be sure you utilize the proper cleaners and adhere to all your national, state, county, province or city regulations regarding the sanitation of your space and the spread of germs and pathogens. While you may well be diligent in the disinfecting of your space, some of the items mentioned in this piece are easy to overlook, and can lead to the client having misconceptions about your practice. Taking a little extra time in making sure every item and every space your client encounters is free of any trace of previous clients is paramount to a positive impression being left in the mind of the client. They will feel well cared for, protected, and confident in your ability to provide quality treatment in a clean and well-kept environment.


    At MassageWarehouse.com, massage therapist enjoy a one-stop shop for professional quality massage products at the lowest prices available. Rely on Massage Warehouse massage therapy supply, salon equipment and supplies and spa equipment and supplies needs.

    read more

    David Otto Q & A – Running for the Massage Therapy Profession

    March 16th, 2016

    David J. Otto is preparing to run an experience of a lifetime…the 2016 Boston Marathon. He is running on behalf of the Massage Therapy Foundation as part of the John Hancock Non-Profit Marathon Program.

    Support David’s Run for Research today by making a donation to his fundraising campaign at https://www.crowdrise.com/massagetherapyboston2016/fundraiser/davidotto

    Recovery and self-care are an important part of any training program. Find out more about David and how he is incorporating some products from Massage Warehouse. Massage Warehouse is David’s corporate partner, and they are helping to make his dream of running Boston a reality.

    Q: You are raising funds for the Massage Therapy Foundation. How is that going? Are you doing anything unique as a part of your fundraising efforts?

    A: Raising funds for the Foundation is turning out to be pretty fun so far! I came into the program with the expectation that I could do a lot of it online and with community-based events that would generate funds for the Massage Therapy Foundation (MTF).

    Word of mouth is certainly a method that I am using with my family, friends and clients .Although it is not so unique, I have decided to add handing out a business-card-sized ‘flyer’ – which is an invitation to donate, learn more about the MTF, and a thank you. My personal conversations with each person can blossom into more sharing opportunities for spreading the word of my fundraising efforts.

    I have been SO fortunate to have the support of several colleagues that are also fundraising on my behalf.,: Collette Wilson is doing a “bake sale” and donating the value of “one [of her] retail massage” prices every week for a couple of months…and several Facebook Friends took her up on her public challenge in one way or another. Ariana’s personal time in organizing official meetups for my fundraising events and being my Trade Partner for recovery massage therapy during my training is another example of supporting me in my dream of running in the 120th Boston Marathon. Many, many Facebook and Twitter friends and organizations Share and Re-Tweet my constant updates – my workouts, event announcements, blog entries – so creating, having, and maintaining those relationships is part of my fund- and awareness-raising strategy.

    Right now, that is what I have been doing but it is still a challenge and I need your help. Please consider making a donation to my campaign. Your support – no matter what the amount – would mean the world to me but more importantly, your donation advances the practice of massage therapy through research, education and community service. That is the mission of the Massage Therapy Foundation and the reason why I am raising funds – and running the Boston Marathon.

    Q: Are there any special donors that you would like to thank?

    It is really difficult to say a particular, individual donor is ‘special’ – EVERY donor is special in my book! I try to Thank (profusely!) Every donation is appreciated!

    Massage Warehouse carries a host of product and service professionals that are really caring about not only the massage therapy profession but also the professionals. As my corporate partner during my journey to the 120th running of the Boston Marathon, I have the pleasure of working directly with this great team. I cannot express my gratitude enough for their involvement.

    Q: You mentioned last week that you are incorporating weekly massage treatments. What else are you doing as part of your regular recovery routine?

    A: SLEEP! And “napping, while getting a massage” is optimal!

    I am starting to incorporate a lubricant in my massage that reduces inflammation, Soothing Touch’s Muscle Comfort Massage Cream. Lubricants like sports gels and oils or creams infused with arnica, olive oil, and/or eucalyptus for example, can help me be more resilient, experience less pain due to [systemic] inflammation, and feel invigorated, to name a few benefits I have experienced.

    And SLEEP! Letting my body do all its natural, metabolic processes is a very important part of my recovery – and preparatory – regimen. Making sure I am getting 7-8 hours per night is a challenge for me – and not always successful – but I am aware of my particular need and do everything to make it a quality recovery technique.

    Running for the Massage Therapy Profession

    March 1st, 2016

    Running for the Massage Therapy Profession

    On April 18, massage therapist David J. Otto will be running in the Boston Marathon to raise money and awareness for the Massage Therapy Foundation (MTF), an organization that works to advance the knowledge and practice of massage therapy by supporting scientific research, education, and community service grants. The Foundation is pleased to include Massage Warehouse as David’s corporate partner on this journey to run in this world-class event.  

    Support David’s Run for Research today by making a donation to his fundraising campaign at https://www.crowdrise.com/massagetherapyboston2016/fundraiser/davidotto


    Learn a little more about David

    When did you decide massage therapy was the right career for you?

    A: I had my first professional massage at Disney World in 1998. After mastering most of the middle-management positions in employment until that time, I felt like massage therapy was a field that would take time and caring in order to master: a professionally satisfying attempt to better myself as well as help others.

    How did your participation in the 2016 Boston Marathon come about?

    A: I have been volunteering for the Massage Therapy Foundation (MTF) since just before they started participating in the John Hancock Non-Profit Marathon program in 2013. I have kept a close eye on its progress and decided to apply this year. I am so passionate about the Massage Therapy Foundation’s mission and running that it became the perfect combination. I found myself being drawn into helping spread the word to other professionals who feel the same passion to move massage therapy forward. Donating to the Massage Therapy Foundation advances the profession.

    In your experience, how does massage therapy integrate into and benefit a marathon training regimen?

    A: Recovery is a very important aspect of training. Massage therapy helps me the most. Regular massage no more than 24 hours after a long run is my regiment. Increasing the amount of massage, sleep, mileage, strength-training and dieting is my training process.

    After a long run, I have been receiving a 60-minute Swedish massage session and I have noticed the pain lessens quicker. Normally, it takes a day or so to recover from pain and range-of-motion restrictions from a long run. When I get massage after a long run, I can feel my pain-recovery time cut into less than a day, meaning the next day bears no aches. I think any person can integrate that success, using massage therapy, into whatever level of training [that person’s] long run coincides [with].

    How has your corporate partner, Massage Warehouse helped you during this journey to Boston?

    There is no doubt that I am able to enjoy this experience of a lifetime thanks to the generosity of Massage Warehouse. As my corporate partner, they have helped cover the high expenses to make this journey to Boston a reality. In addition, their team has provided me with marketing support, personal encouragement, and recently sent me a wealth of product to use during my training. I have added using new products such as Soothing Touch Massage Cream Muscle Comfort during my massage sessions, Theraband tape to get the right stretch every time I need kinesiology taping, a Thera-band Exercise ball to strengthen, tone and increase my core flexibility, and Therapearl Hot & Cold packs for improved blood flow and relaxation of my muscles during recovery.

    How can YOU get involved?

    A: First, I would ask you to consider making a donation to my fundraising campaign at the link below. Any amount – $25, $50, or $100 is greatly appreciated and will help my efforts to raise $10,000 for the Massage Therapy Foundation.

    Second – please consider purchasing your professional products from our friends at Massage Warehouse. They have been dedicated to the massage therapy profession for over ten years, and in my experience they always support efforts in the massage therapy world. I am honored to have them as my corporate partner. We know you have options but consider who is giving back to your profession. The team at Massage Warehouse is not only giving back to you, but they are advancing the practice by being a corporate partner with the Massage Therapy Foundation.

    Don’t delay making your donation – there is only six weeks left until I arrive in Boston for the experience of a lifetime – running in the 120th Boston Marathon for the Massage Therapy Foundation.

    Click Here to Make Your Donation Today

    Winter Spa Rehab Treatment Protocol.

    February 22nd, 2016

    Winter-Rehab (2)


    Winter Spa Rehab Treatment Protocol.

    By Angie Dubis

    Treat your customers to a relaxing and restorative winter rejuvenation treatment.

    Tips for Success:

    Build take homes into the cost of the therapy to encourage self-care and future retail sales. Take homes give people warm fuzzy feelings that they will associate with you! Plus, they get the opportunity to try products out for themselves at home without any pressure to purchase. If they love it, they will ask where they can get more, opening up the door for you to offer them retail sizes of the products they love.

    • Dispense 3 oz. of exfoliant into 4 oz. container with lid and send home with the client.

    Add $3 to treatment price to cover cost.

    • Quick wash Exfoliating Hydro Gloves, place in a zip-lock bag and send home with client.

    Add $2 to treatment price to cover cost.

    Treatment Details:

    Session Duration: 75 minutes

    Product & Supply Cost/Session: $8 – $12

    Suggested Price: $90 – $120

    TREATMENT GUIDE: (refer to Massage Warehouse SPA Protocol for step by step instructions)

    1. Dispense exfoliant, body mud and body butter into rubber spa bowls. Mix 10 drops of Geranium essential oil into mud (can be added to all products). Place products in heating unit to warm.
    2. Place Hot Stones in heating unit.
    3. Starting with client in a prone position, apply exfoliation protocol to posterior body.
    4. Client flips to supine position, apply exfoliation protocol to anterior body. *Add Breast Drape
    5. Have client sit up, roll bottom towel to base of spine, apply hydrating mud to back and have client lay back down with back now resting on thermoplastic film.
    6. Apply hydrating mud to legs, arms, belly and upper chest, wrapping thermoplastic film around each after application. Cover each completed region with top bath towel as you move around the table.
    7. Cocoon client in thermal blanket, then wrap the regular blanket around the thermal blanket cocoon. Client stays in the cocoon for 15 – 20 minutes. During this time, perform gentle compressions on the legs, arms and shoulders; gently rock the client from the hips; or perform a face, head and neck massage by slightly opening the cocoon at the top. *Do NOT leave the room!
    8. After the allotted time, slowly open the cocoon and begin removing the thermoplastic film one area at a time. As you remove the film, gather as much mud as possible, rolling the plastic into itself to contain the mud. Remove excess mud with moist, warmed towels.
    9. Once complete, transition client into regular massage setup, removing the thermal blanket and thermoplastic film. Make one more pass over the body with a moist, warmed hand towel.
    10. Complete the therapy with a 10 minute Hot Stone massage using body butter.


    • 2 oz. of Bon Vital’® Spa Sugar Scrub
    • 2 oz. of Hydrating Body Mud
    • 12 Drops of Bon Vital’® Geranium Essential Oil
    • 1 oz. of Bon Vital’® Body Butter


    • 1 Pair of Exfoliating Hydro Gloves
    • 3 Rubber Spa Bowls
    • 7 to 10 Hand Towels (8 Warmed)
    • 1 Sheet of Thermoplastic Film
    • 4 to 6 Hot Stones

    TABLE SET UP (from table up)

    • Fitted Sheet
    • Flat Sheet
    • Regular Blanket
    • Thermal Blanket
    • Thermoplastic Film
    • 2 Large Bath Towels
    • Face Cradle with Cover

    Buy Spa treatment supplies

    Spa Treatment Protocol

    February 19th, 2016

    Spa Treatment Protocol

    If you haven’t already, now is a great time to start offering customized SPA treatments to your clients. SPA treatments are a great way to diversify your practice offerings and attract new clients. Many consumers are seeking options to help them manage stress and improve personal care. These clients are seeking therapies they can integrate into their existing health care routines that will help them improve health and prevent future problems.

    Capitalizing on the momentum toward self-care does not mean you need to offer a large expanded variety of SPA menu items, in reality, a small offering that allows clients to customize to their needs will get you more flash to bang. Customers are looking for options that help them learn how to care for themselves, are affordable, and convenient.


    This protocol is designed to give therapists a basic online for performing SPA therapies in a dry room setting. This protocol can be easily adapted if you have access to water sources such as in room showers. It can further be adapted by breaking out each step to create your own customized SPA treatments.



    Loofahs and Sponges Scrubs Body Brushes

    We need to prepare the skin so that the treatment step is as effective as possible. We do this by exfoliating the skin using the exfoliation technique that best suits your client’s needs, treatment duration and setting.

    Exfoliation softens and smooths the skin by removing dead skin cells and debris. Exfoliation can be a very relaxing experience for the client and has the additional benefit of stimulating lymphatic flow and circulation.

    There are many products and tools available that can be used for exfoliation. Selecting the right one is easy if you consider a few simple details:

    • Client’s Needs – It is important to think about the intent of the therapy when selecting an exfoliation product or tool. If a client is older, they may have thinner skin and may need a gentler exfoliant, compared to someone who is younger or who works in the sun and has thicker skin. Additionally, a client who has oily skin may need a different product than someone who has dry cracked skin.
    • Treatment Duration – If you are performing a “mini” treatment it may be more time efficient to choose to use an exfoliating tool, such as a dry brush in comparison to an exfoliation product that has to be applied and removed.
    • Setting – It is important to consider the setting in which the therapy is taking place when determining what exfoliation products or tools to use. If you work in an office or in a client’s home that is carpeted, it may make more sense to use a Dry Brush, exfoliating gloves, Buff or other water based product compared to an oil based Sugar or Salt Scrub. This is especially true if you have not perfected your application and removal techniques as the oil based products, if not managed properly, can get oil on the carpet which then attracts dirt leaving dark stains. If you are in such a situation and need a more aggressive exfoliant you can combine a buff with an exfoliating glove to get the same effect.


    Herbs & Wraps Balms Aromatherapy Parapango

    The treatment step is where we accomplish the therapeutic goals of the session. The goals may include the desire to hydrate dry skin, firm or reduce the appearance of cellulite, detoxify, reduce pain or discomfort, or to relax and reduce stress. One popular and effective technique used during the treatment step is to wrap the body in a thermal blanket for 15 to 20 minutes. Treatment products are selected based on the treatment goal, duration of the therapy, and setting.

    A Few Things to Consider when Selecting Products:


    • Treatment Goal – Be sure you understand what the client considers the treatment goal to be. They may want to hydrate dry skin AND reduce stress. In this case, you may consider adding several drops of an essential oil, such as Geranium oil, that has both relaxing properties for the mind and healing properties for the skin. * Remember essential oils should not be applied directly to the skin, but should be mixed in a carrier oil to prevent irritation.
    • Duration of Therapy – Some treatment products are applied and removed while others are left on the skin and become the finishing product. Additionally, once applied some products need to remain on the skin longer than others to give time for the therapeutic properties to take effect. Be sure you understand the requirements of the product you are using to maximize benefit. Typically, products that are applied and removed will need more session time than those that stay on the skin to become the finish product.
    • Setting – Dry Room product are easily removed with warm towels, making them versatile and easy to use in almost any setting. Some treatment products are designed for Dry Room therapies, meaning, you do not need a water source like an in-room shower to use them, others are not Dry Room friendly and require a water source. Be sure you are using the appropriate product for your environment by getting familiar with a products properties before using them on a paying client.
    • Compatibility of Product/Technique – All products used in a SPA treatment should enhance the treatment goal, but we also need to think about how one step leads into the next. For example, if you are using a treatment product that will become the finishing product, it is very important to ensure a complete removal of your exfoliant, otherwise the client will leave still feeling grains of the exfoliant on their skin! You might even decide to exfoliate using a dry brush in this situation. If, on the other hand, you are using a mud for your treatment step, the mud will often grab any remaining exfoliant and both will be removed with the warm towels.


    Creams & Butters Lotions Hot Stone

    The finish step of our SPA protocol includes finish products and finish techniques. The finish may last from 5 minutes to an hour, depending on the intent.

    Finish products are the last product to be applied to the skin. Like products used in Step 1 (Prep) and Step 2 (Treatment), they should contribute to the intended treatment goals of the therapy. The finish product is typically intended to “close” the skin by protecting it from the outside world and by replacing moisture that may have been lost during Steps 1 or 2 of the treatment. As mentioned earlier, the product used in Step 2 (treatment) may become the finish product. This is often the case in an aromatherapy wrap.

    Finish techniques, like products, are selected based on their contribution to the treatment goals of the therapy. If the primary treatment goal was to de-stress, then a 30 minute Swedish or Hot Stone massage would be great ways to finish the therapy. If the treatment goal was to detoxify, a 30 minute Lymphatic Drainage massage may be appropriate. If you are performing a 30 minute “mini” treatment, 5 minutes of rocking, compression and stretching may tie the therapy together nicely. The important things are to consider which techniques best suit the treatment goals and to properly schedule the session to include the appropriate amount of time needed.


    Dry Room SPA therapies can be performed in almost any massage office and even at a client’s home with a little forethought and preparation. It is important, regardless of setting, for the room to be on the w


    arm side so the client does not become chilled as product is applied and removed.

    List of Supplies You Will Need:

    Basic Massage Table Setup (In Order from Bottom to Top):

    • Bolster
    • Fitted Sheet
    • Flat Sheet
    • Blanket
    • Thermal Blanket
    • Thermoplastic Film
    • 2 Large Bath Sheets
    • Add Head Rest with Face Cradle Cover


    After conducting an intake to determine if any contraindications exist and to clarify treatment goals, direct the client to undress and lay in a prone position (face down) under the top bath towel and on top of the bottom bath towel. Leave the room while they do so.

    Some offices have supply cabinets or rooms, while others have products and equipment in the treatment room with the client. If you work in a location with a supply cabinet, dispense applicable products into rubber spa bowls while the client is preparing for the therapy, otherwise dispense products into bowls as you introduce them to the client prior to application. This is a final check to ensure that there are no allergy or client concerns. You should have already placed 8 to 10 moist hand towels into your warming devise.

    Step 1 – Preparation

    1. Undrape client to expose the back to just 

      below the top of the hips.

    2. Apply approximately (varies based on client size and product) a tablespoon amount of exfoliant to the back in one long stroke running from the base of the neck to the top of the sacrum. Spread the exfoliant from the center line out to the sides of the body using small circular motions with both hands. When your hands reach the side, bring them back to center and moving slightly higher up the back and repeat motion to the sides. Continue this motion until you reach the shoulders. Repeat movement, working down the back until you reach the sacrum, then make a third pass, ending at the shoulders. *Pressure is coming from your fingertips. Motion is small circular movement – NOT massage – do not rub the exfoliant in. Each area should receive 3 passes. The skin should become slightly pink and rosy.
    3. Apply a small amount of exfoliant to the back of the arms. Working one arm at a time, in small circular motions, move from the shoulder to the wrist, back to shoulder and back to wrist, finish with exfoliation to the front and back of the hand. *Be sure to lift the arm and shoulder slightly to allow you to exfoliate the front of the arm. Pay special attention to the elbow or areas of rough, dry skin.
    4. Cover the back with the top towel and un-drape the client’s left leg. Make sure to drape properly to ensure client comfort. * You may elect to offer disposable panties or clients may wish to keep bottom under garments on.
    5. Apply approximately (varies based on client size and product) a tablespoon amount of exfoliant to the back of the left leg in one long stroke running from the ankle to the top of the hip. While facing the head of the table, spread the exfoliant around the crest of the hip and gluteal area in small circular motions with one hand, keeping client comfort in mind. Repeat this movement three times.
    6. Starting at the top of the leg, continue spreading the exfoliant from the center line to outside of the leg. When you reach the table return to center working down the leg one section at a time. Once you have worked one third of the way down the leg, begin to perform movement to the inside of the leg as well, keeping client modesty in mind. Once you reach the ankle reverse direction, returning to the top of the leg and back to the ankle. *Movement is performed in small circular motions with both hands.
    7. Exfoliate left foot using the same movement, cover leg with bath towel and repeat on right leg.
    8. Once exfoliation on the posterior body is complete, undrape the client’s back.
    9. Remove a towel from warming caddie and, after checking for comfort, lay the towel across the client’s back to cover from neck to the top of the hip. Press the warm towel into the client’s back to soften the exfoliation product for easier removal. Then, using a bunching motion, gather the exfoliant with the towel as you work the towel down the back.
    10. Fold the towel in half long ways with the side that was touching the back to the inside, leaving the unused portion of the towel on the outside.
    11. Lay the half folded towel across the back of the left arm and press gently. Again, using a bunching motion, remove the exfoliant from the front and back of the arm.
    12. Using the last unused side of the towel repeat removal on the right arm.
    13. Cover the back and arms with the top bath towel.
    14. Undrape the left leg and lay a fresh towel across the leg covering the hip and the top of the left leg. Press the towel into the hip and leg, before sliding it down to cover the lower leg. Press the towel into the lower leg. Slide the towel back to the top of the hip, using a bunching motion gather the exfoliant with the towel as you work down the leg to the foot. Cover the leg with the top bath towel.
    15. Depending on the thickness of the towel and your speed, you may be able to use the un-used side of the towel to repeat removal on the right leg, assuming the towel is still hot. Otherwise, repeat removal with a fresh towel on the right leg. Cover when complete.
    16. Ask client to flip to a supine position. Insert a 

      breast drape if appropriate.

    17. Using the same technique as on the posterior body, apply exfoliant to the upper chest, belly and anterior of both legs.
    18. Using the same technique as the posterior body remove the exfoliant from the left leg, then the right, then the belly and upper chest. One towel for the chest and one towel for both legs.

    Step 2 – Treatment

    1. Have the client sit up so that you can roll the bottom bath towel down to the top of the hips. While the client is sitting up apply your treatment product to the back, then have the client lay down onto the plastic film.
    2. Have the client left their hips slightly so you can remove the bottom bath towel by sliding it out from under their backside and legs.
    3. Have the client bend the left leg up slightly so you can reach the backside of the leg. Using one hand, apply your treatment product to the back of the leg. Have the client extend the leg and apply product to the front of the leg. Once complete wrap the leg in the underling plastic film. Cover with the top bath towel.
    4. Repeat on the right leg.
    5. Moving to the head of the table, undrape, apply the treatment product to the arms, belly and upper chest. Wrap in plastic and recover with the bath towel.
    6. Cocoon the client in the thermal blanket and regular blanket. Client stays in the cocoon for 15 to 20 minutes. This is a perfect time to do a face/scalp massage.
    7. When appropriate unwrap the cocoon. *Do this slowly to avoid creating a draft.
    8. Undrape the left leg and pull the plastic film off the leg, gathering as much of your treatment product with the plastic as possible. *Be sure to roll the film into itself to contain the product.
    9. Using a warm moist towel cover the entire front of the top of the left leg. Press the moist towel into the leg. Slide the towel down to cover the bottom of the leg. Press the towel into the leg. Fold the towel in half so that the inside is the unused portion. Then fold the towel into a quarter fold so it is easy to hold in one hand. Use this to clean off the foot and remove any remaining product that is on the front of the leg.
    10. Moving the plastic film to the inside place the foot flat on the top of the thermal blanket with the client’s knee bent. Clean the treatment product off of the back of the leg.
    11. Once complete bend the left leg to 90 degrees and bring the left ankle to the outside of the right knee. This will hold the left leg out of the way while you roll the remaining plastic wrap in on itself, fold the thermal blanket and regular blanket to the inside. Return the left leg to an extended position on top of the top sheet.
    12. Repeat on the right leg using the same technique. *Use the clean side of the same towel if it is still warm enough, otherwise use a fresh towel.
    13. Undrape the upper body. Making sure the breast drape is still in place. Remove the plastic from the right arm, collecting as much treatment product as possible and rolling the plastic in to contain the product.
    14. Fold a fresh moist towel in half long ways and lay across the arm covering from shoulder to wrist. Press the towel into the arm. Wipe to remove product from the front of the arm. Cross the arm across the chest to remove product from the back of the arm. Plastic wrap should still be covering the chest so you can rest the arm without getting product on it. As the arm rests across the chest roll the plastic wrap close to the body, roll the thermal and regular blanket in and return the arm to rest on top of the top sheet. Repeat on left arm using the other side of the half folded towel.
    15. Once arms are complete, open the half folded towel and refold in half the short way with the unused portions on the outside. Use one side to remove product from the upper chest and the other side to remove product from the belly. Recover with top bath towel.
    16. Have the client sit up ensuring the plastic wrap comes with them. Have a warm towel ready. Remove plastic film, gathering as much treatment product as possible and rolling plastic wrap inward to contain product. Lay the warm moist towel across the client’s back and press several times. Leave the towel in place. Roll the thermal blanket to the top of the hips, keeping it separated from the plastic film. Then accordion the regular blanket and top sheet so they are bunched at the top of the hips. After removing the treatment product with the hot towel have the client lay back down onto the bottom most sheet.
    17. Gathering the plastic film, thermal blanket, regular blanket and top sheet in your hands on either side of the clients hips, ask the client to lift their hips as you slide the material down to kne 

      e level. Now ask the client to lift their heels, bring all the materials out from under their legs and back up to cover the client.

    18. Remove the plastic and the thermal blanket and your client is ready for the finishing step!

    Step 3 – Finish

    1. Undrape the client’s arms, legs and chest one section at a time and using a warm, moist towel complete one final cleaning pass to ensure complete removal of product.
    2. Once complete apply your finish product and perform finishing techniques to close out the therapy.beyond-products_Feb-winter-rehab

    What Do I do AFTER Massage School?

    February 4th, 2016

    What Do I do AFTER Massage School?

    When you went to massage school, you were trained by a specialist.  How do you know what you are trained to do?  What does your training mean?  How do we discuss what we do? If you were not trained by a specialist – trained in the general sense – you may not be able to speak specifically enough about your work to call it “specialized.

    Massage school may or may not be what you expected it to be.  Most school owners and instructors are specialists, meaning: they have taken their basic training and focused the development on their practice in one or two techniques or modality areas.  I had an instructor named Jon Heart.  He was one of the major influences in my practice when I graduated. He is an amazing deep tissue massage instructor; however, he did not make me into a well-rounded therapist.  Most of us did not expect to practice in the professional world exactly what we learned in massage school.  But after we get done with our massage programs, can we say what it was all about?

    Most of us graduated from massage school and we started looking for job.  Many of us took the first job that came along.  The location at which we are employed does not necessarily mean we are “a Spa Massage Therapist”.  I work at a spa and a massage clinic.  I can talk about Kinesiology in either setting, and I build my client base in both settings.  The best way to look at what you do is not based solely on the location of your practice: look into what specialty you enjoy and will continue to study in the profession.

    Massage school is just the beginning; however, at the end of your training, you need to ask yourself “What does my training mean?”  The biggest challenge in teaching is effectively communicating how and what to study.  If you had a teacher who pushed you to look at specific topics you would find out the answers s/he is looking for.  Hopefully, you also applied some of the information and started thinking logically about the concepts being presented.  If you were never introduced to ideas, you probably wouldn’t have expanded your knowledge of the subject.  I can see several categories of massage therapist that initially produce a type of trained massage therapist in our field.  Below are the categories I am suggesting to the profession for training.

    A classically-trained massage therapist graduates with entry level knowledge and performance.  These types of massage therapists can also advance in classical training by expanding their knowledge of Swedish techniques.  These basic skills are where a massage therapist with a minimum of 500 classroom hours in massage school will most likely graduate.  If you are a classically-trained therapist, that does not mean you cannot change your practice, it just means you need more education/experience to become additionally specialized. I would say many massage school graduates come out classically-trained and start working for an employer that does not require more.  If this is your passion, embrace it and love the wonderful work you will continue to do.  You will change many people’s lives and make many people happy.

    Hints: You most likely have a routine or standard massage that works well for you and is very patterned.  You ask about medications and injuries to avoid contraindications and provide a safe massage experience. You usually refer to strokes and their therapeutic benefits to explain why massage is good for your clients.

    A clinically-trained therapist usually looks at the physical status of the client before making a treatment plan.  This includes any number of pathologies, ranging from a sprained toe to many forms of cancer.  Most clinically-trained massage therapists do not start this way.  Being specialized in this sense requires advanced training, beyond classical training, that prepares you for application of a specific technique for a specific condition.  I believe one of the biggest things that sets these therapists apart from classically-trained therapists is their willingness to work with clients who are in many different stages of illness, from the athlete to the hospice patient: each client is very unique.

    Hints: You ask your clients what issues they are having so you can focus on it.  You want a complete health history to make sure there are no medication or systemic or specific health issues you may need to consider.  The bigger the health issue, the more excited you get to see what you can do for the client. You usually work in collaboration with or actually inside a medical facility (doctor, doctor’s office, hospital, pain management clinic, rehabilitation facility, etc).

    Spa- or Service-Trained:
    A spa- or service-trained therapist will be most successful if they study sales, product placement and the art of ambiance – customer service is a high priority.  All therapists need to be able to sell their services or they will not have a strong business or strong support for their employer’s business.  Service training will give you the ability to expand on your business.  Many massage therapists who worked as waiters or waitresses while in school received this training as they prepared for their profession.  Just because you are a good massage therapist does not make you a good salesperson and vice versa.  Product knowledge and research are key to this profession.

    Hints: You want to know what is in everything: all your products, all your supplies, and how to maximize the client’s benefit with the most skill.  This usually includes specialty in hydrotherapy, aromatherapy, skin applications, and advanced customer communication skills.  You ask about pathology so you can see if there will be any reactions to the products you regularly use.

    Energetic training for a therapist can be quite rigorous.  Some therapists have this information come naturally to them.  Others are advanced practitioners of the quantum realm.  From Reiki Masters to quantum healers, this training includes more than just touch.  Some specialists can operate without touch, however, to keep it in the profession of massage therapy (not of Bodywork, as well) we categorize only therapists that use hands-on techniques or use the other only in conjunction with hands-on work.

    Hints: You usually look to something outside the musculature for cause and effect.  You want to know more than just what activity they have been doing, but sometimes how they feel about doing it.  You ask about health history to see what the effects maybe by changing the energetic body to help.

    Combining these Training types can give you a specialty that many others may not have.  However, if you are mediocre at practicing or applying many of these types together, in one practice or service menu, it is going to be tough to stand out and be successful in any one of them.  Remember: if you do what you love and love what you do, you will find a reason to be successful.  Massages can rarely feel like an hour when you go beyond your massage school program: reach out to the specialty that interests you at this point in your career – integrate new techniques and modalities that help you put your practice in a class of its own.

    To improve your training I would suggest the following online courses provided by www.MassageWarehouse.com

    Nathan J. Nordstrom LMT LMP BCMT

    Educated Touch

    P.O. Box 329

    Oakesdale, Washington 99158



    At MassageWarehouse.com, massage therapist enjoy a one-stop shop for professional quality massage products at the lowest prices available.  Rely on Massage Warehouse massage therapy supply, massage tables and spa equipment needs.

    Strategic Income Planning

    December 9th, 2015

    Strategic Income Planning

    Painless Tips To Make More Money In 2016

    By Angie Patrick

    Who doesn’t enjoy a raise? A raise means someone acknowledges you and your efforts for another year of service. It means you have performed well at a certain level and now it is time to reward your efforts by raising your earnings a little.

    A raise is something we have all come to think of a synonymous with doing a good job and being rewarded for that good job in a monetary way by our employer. No, I do not believe anyone ever said, “What? A raise for me? No Thank You!”

    But what if you are self-employed? What if “the boss” who so graciously divvies up raises happens to be the same person as the purchaser, the scheduler, the therapist, the marketer, the janitor and the chief bottle washer? How do you give yourself more money from a business you think you run like a tight ship, and a workload and that is at maximum capacity? You look for new ways, that’s how. Money hides in the darndest places, and finding ways to eke out a couple more percent here can add up to a net pay raise overall for you. I want to look at a few places your money is hiding from you, and give you a few tips on how to coax it back into your pocket.

    Preventing Client Churn

    In most businesses, churn happens naturally for a variety of reasons. But sometimes, it is because of specific reasons and these may well be reasons you have control over. Before we can look at why customers leave, we need to first have a means to identify they have left.

      Now, I understand many clients come for a specific issue and then once that issue is resolved, they stop coming. We all want to be known as the therapist who helped Jimmy with his frozen shoulder before his big golf game. But do we just accept Jimmy will not be returning because the issue has found resolution? When this happens, do you just allow them to go or do you offer other means to serve their needs and provide education to support this? I am sure you are familiar with the old adage, “An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure.” These are clients that have experienced your talent and skill first hand, likely are candidates to continue to visit you to prevent issues. It takes education on the importance of prevention and the means to keep in contact with that client long after the initial issue has resolved. A client who knows you will likely return if they have received good service, been treated well, and have seen the value in what you provide. These same clients that are now better as a result of your care may well wish to remain under your preventative care to ward off future issues. This is a client you can count on, and can rebook. But if you just allow them to leave without providing alternatives, you have to work hard to find a replacement client.

    When a client does make the decision to leave, do you ever learn why? Do you notice they are no longer booking with you? It is more common than you might believe to have a client slip through your hands unnoticed. Having a means to track client visits and reach out to them on a regular basis is important. Whether you do this through personal calling, a newsletter, or email; customer outreach is hugely important to a successful practice. Knowing when a client leaves as early as you can detect it, will give you the ability to call and check in with them and learn if they are in need of making an appointment or have moved on to other pastures. If they have moved on, I always think it is important to try and determine what prompted the decision to leave your practice. This conversation need not be confrontational, but more informational. Perhaps they had a bad experience, one for which you were wholly unaware. Learning about it and finding the root cause to prevent re-occurrence can save you future client departures for the same reasons.

    The money and time spent keeping a client is far better spent than spinning through new client after new client that seldom return. I am not advocating fabricating reasons or issues that compel your client to return out of fear. I am advocating your taking a preventative stance, and sharing with them what you know to be true. Regular massage brings along with it many significant health benefits. Educating your client on the benefits of regular massage can help you keep your client happy and satisfied, and your booking calendar full.

    Eliminate ” No Show” Clients Early On

    We all have them, those client that book a block of time, and then on the day of appointment they don’t show up and you find yourself sitting on 60-90 minutes of booked time. This happens and is part of life, but working to nip this behavior in the bud is the best means of prevention. There are a few ways you can help alleviate this issue.

    First, consider spending time the day before reaching out to your clients by phone to remind them of the appointment. Sometimes, this will enable you to learn ahead of time any challenges the client has come across in making the appointment allowing you time to rebook. Second, consider a ” no-show” fee. If a client has booked with you and fails to show without contacting you in enough time to work to rebook the time, then a fee could be charged. Having explained this fee and the consequences up front can help eliminate this issue fully. No one wants to pay a fee, but additionally, no one wants to be “surprised” by one either. Clear guidelines need to be set up and discussed before a client books so they know what to expect.

    Lastly, most people want to be respectful of your time, but will take any slack you allow them. Make sure you have clear guidelines as to when to show up for an appointment, and when the appointment is over, regardless of late arrival.  If a client arrives late, still see them, but being clear that they have taken up their own appointment time in being late ahead of time makes for a less uncomfortable exchange and can help prevent lateness the next time.

    Remember, your time is your money. When you allow your time to be wasted by clients who don’t show, or are chronically late, it is you who pays for it. Think carefully about these issues and find a place of comfort you can live with and then inform the clients of your policies. They will work to adhere to your guidelines, and when they cannot, they know what to expect.

    Supply Chain Management

    As a therapist, you are a consumer of professional products, specifically related to the work you do. Have you ever considered how you purchase your goods as a means to add black ink to your bottom line? Having a strong understanding of your supply needs, timing, and consolidation of purchases, as well as how you choose to pay for them can save you money.

    Let’s say you are a therapist who orders just what is needed, just in time for the previous product to run out. You order weekly, or perhaps every other week, and order just enough to satisfy the needs of the next two weeks. This is called “Just In Time” ordering, and can work for many. However, if you take a step back, and look at your overall purchases for a three month period, you may be able to detect a specific pattern to your needs. Once you can determine what goods you will likely need for the coming quarter, consider buying these all at once. Look online for price breaks on your favorite brands, or freight incentives, and consider buying in bulk. You can save significantly by the gallon if you go from buying five individual gallons, to buying a five gallon pail. The savings are real and are important enough to take a longer look into what else you may be able to buy quarterly instead of bi-weekly.

    Once you have determined that you may well be able to save not only money, but time when you place the planned quarterly order, you may want to consider how you pay for these goods. Many opt for paying cash or using a debit card. This is always good, and can give you real-time accounting of what money you have right now. But with a little forethought, you can structure these buys to provide you rebates, points or cash back on the goods you know you are going to need anyway. In my experience, I have seen successful businesses have a business-only charge card and they search for the ones providing the greatest loyalty benefit to the business. Maybe you prefer a percentage as cash back of purchases, or perhaps you would like to earn points towards a personal reward like that set of gourmet pots and pans you have always wanted. Using a card for these purchases, then paying the card off in full monthly, will help you take advantages of the benefits of using these cards and still alleviate the interest if paid in full each month.

    Hire an Accountant

    I know, it sounds scary, but believe me when I tell you, your accountant will always help you stay on the right path and help provide direction in a whole host of ways that ultimately save you money. This is the single best piece of advice you can be given in my opinion, and here is why: Do you know what education expenses are deductible? Do you have all the answers in regards to claiming a client gift or dinner, what is deductible and what is not? Do you know if you can claim attending conferences and what mileage can be claimed? How about association fees, or other business related forum fees? Most people don’t have this committed to memory, and chances are this is not your center of focus either. Just as your clients hire a professional in your field to provide them with solid advice and care, you should do the same when it comes to your money and the care of your business.

    When you hire an accountant, you can let them manage all the financial issues you may or may not have been doing correctly, thus allowing you to focus on building your business and retaining clients. They can worry about filing taxes, returns, exemptions, deductions, and all those things most of us find nebulous at best. An accountant is certainly handy to help you put accounting management tools in place so you can also have greater visibility to the overall financial health of your company. Obtaining the advice of this type of professional is a smart business decision and one that will save you from mis-steps and pitfalls often made when braving these endeavors on your own.

    Ultimately, in order to save yourself the maximum amounts of time and money possible, you need to take a close look at your processes, how you do things, and seek ways to improve or streamline them. No doubt, when you take each part of the business management role you play and look to find sleeker more streamlined ways of management, you will not only save time but money, too. For most of us, these two things are one in the same. Any time or money saved can be spent doing things you enjoy, spending time with family, or even just reinvesting it into your business. Isn’t this the same we would do with a raise from an employer? Take a weekend, and re-evaluate where you can streamline and consolidate, or improve processes like retaining clients and re-booking. Doing so now can net larger dividends for you in 2016!

    At MassageWarehouse.com, massage therapist enjoy a one-stop shop for professional quality massage products at the lowest prices available.  Rely on Massage Warehouse massage therapy supply, pedicure tools and spa equipment needs.

    read more

    NRG Premium Microfiber Massage Sheet Set

    November 30th, 2015

    Check out the New NRG Premium Microfiber Massage Sheets Set

    Our Premium Microfiber Massage Sheet Set represents the ultimate in quality, comfort and durability. made from 100% double brushed polyester, these light weight, soft as silk sheets are wrinkle resistant right out of the dryer and resist pilling. The perfect addition to your massage or spa table.

    Our massage table sheets will withstand repeated washings with proper care. Pretreat stains before laundering, especially stains resulting from oil-based products. Wash in warm water with mild detergent and tumble dry on low heat. 120 GSM (Grams per Square Meter). Do not bleach.

    Massage Spa Sheets Set Includes:

    1 Fitted Massage Sheet (7″ drop – 36″ x 77″)
    1 Flat Massage Sheet (63″ x 100″)
    1 Crescent Cover (13″ x 13″ x 6″)2290221L

    Check out this amazing new NRG Massage Table Vedalux

    October 9th, 2015

    New NRG Massage Table Vedalux

    By Day Spa Association

    When you think there can’t possibly be a new table in the market, Massage Warehouse introduces the NRG Vedalux massage Table, available in 5 colors and includes all the bells and whistles including:

    • 3″ memory foam for the face rest
    • a curved headrest for ultimate comfort
    • double knobs on the legs for strength and security and 3.5″ of triple density foam

    You really have to lay on one to believe how comfortable this table really is.




    Width 30″ Arm Rest Yes
    Height Range 25″ – 35″ Corners Round
    Length 73″ Face Cradle Cushion 3″ Memory Foam
    Working Weight 550 lbs. Table Foam 3.5″ Fireproof Triple Density
    Reiki End Plates Yes Ship Weight 53.5 lbs.
    Shiatsu Cable Yes Carry Case Yes

    Café Brulée Indulgence Signature Massage Treatment by Biotone.

    September 14th, 2015

    Café Brulée Indulgence Signature Massage Treatment by Biotone.


    This full body exfoliation uses a Café Brulée sugar body polish made with pure cane sugar, fine ground coffee and natural exfoliant seeds in a creamy, thick buttery base. Use in combination with warm wet towels to slough away dead skin cells, revealing beautiful, radiant, youthful skin. Then cocoon your clients with a silky layer of Cocoa Comfort Massage Balm with Aloe Vera to hydrate and moisturize. Finish with a relaxing massage, leaving the skin with a natural glow.

    Biotone Sugar Body Polish Cafe Brulee 12 Oz


    Café Brulée Sugar Body Polish 2oz

    Cocoa-Comfort Massage Balm 1.5oz


    2 Rubber spa bowls

    6 warm, moist hand towels


    1. Add 2oz of Café Brulée Sugar Body Polish in a rubber spa bowl.
    2. Add 1.5 oz of Cocoa Comfort Massage Balm in a rubber spa bowl.
    3. Apply 2 oz of Café Brulée Sugar Body Polish following the BIOTONE protocol* for exfoliation.
    4. Apply Cocoa Comfort Massage Balm in an even layer to each part of the body, *while quickly covering each area with plastic wrap. Cover client with towel to keep warm.
    5. While standing at the head of the table, pull up all layers of sheets, thermal wrap and blankets, cocooning the client.
    6. Allow the client to rest wrapped for 15-20 minutes. This is an ideal time to incorporate a face or foot massage into the treatment.
    7. Remove plastic sheet, and perform a finishing massage treatment with the Cocoa Comfort Massage Balm.


    At MassageWarehouse.com, massage therapist enjoy a one-stop shop for professional quality massage products at the lowest prices available.  Rely on Massage Warehouse massage therapy supply and spa equipment needs.